The International League of Conservation Writers is a forum to bring writers together from around the world who are writing to promote wilderness, nature, conservation, or using other means to protect and restore the natural areas, habitats, animals, and plants of our planet. ILCW will present periodic writing awards to authors who excel in this field.

International League of Conservation Writers

Writing to inspire the love of nature and a passion for its protection.


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CALENDAR

September 10-17, 2015

Birding Trip to Portugal,
hosted by ILCW member and Urban Birder David Lindo (UK). David and João Jara, one of Portugal’s premier birders, will explore the Lisbon area, drift around the Alentejo Region and end up in the Algarve. Watch birds as diverse as Greater Flamingo to Red-necked Nightjar, Iberian Imperial Eagle to Azure-winged Magpies.
More information


September 21— 26, 2015

On the River of Discovery with Women
of Influence

Featuring guest Dr. Cheryl Crazy Bull.

On the Green River through Utah’s majestic canyons. All the comforts are included, and the women guides are fun, talented, professional and inspiring. And did we say they do all the cooking!

More information


October 818, 2015

View Pandas in China with
Pandas International

To learn more about and to view pandas around China, travel with Pandas International board member Kim Sheremeta.
More information

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FEATURED VIDEO

The “Singing Wilderness” excerpt


















A documentary (in process) about Sigurd Olson, nature writer and conservationist, displays stunning photography while his words are narrated by a captivating voice. The clip is nearly 8 minutes but it was over before I knew it and left me wanting for more. I look forward to when the film is complete.

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Pangolin’s Elegy

By ILCW member Justin Fenech




Knives cradled in a forested womb

Golden siblings asleep atop each other.

Slithering through the mossy ether

The siblings contract and convalesce.


Though they are as old as their mother

The knife-edged siblings look forward

To a thousand swarming morrows.

But up ahead, another, alien knife looms.


There will be no battle, no fencing.

This is an extermination – no buts.

Who takes heed of this uncouth crucifixion?


Don’t ask any questions.

Just know: it’s happening.










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Threatened Species












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“What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what
we are doing to ourselves and to one another.”
Mahatma Gandhi

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NEWS


Award

ILCW member Stephen Leahy’s new book "YOUR WATER FOOTPRINT just won the Green Book Festival award in NYC for best science book.


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Work to Start on Renovations for
Rocky Mountain Land Library

Jeff Lee, ILCW member and co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Land Library, has been building the collection with his wife Ann Martin for more than twenty years. Please see The New York Times story about their land library collection and soon to be realized planned research institution with artists’ studios, dormitories and dining hall: MORE



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Members Send Your News

If you have news, writings, video links, items that would be of interest to other ILCW members, send it to us for posting. Send to:

patty@ilcwriters.org.

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MEMBER WRITINGS


Hope Floats

The Last Remaining Population of the Brow-Antlered Deer

By ILCW member Cara Tejpal (India)





















Photo by Ranjit Moirangthem


The world’s last remaining population of brow-antlered deer is confined to a few square kilometres of floating habitat in Manipur’s Loktak Lake (India). Endemic and endangered, the sangai needs managerial interventions. Cara Tejpal travels to Manipur in the company of experts to plot the deer’s future.

Dr. A.J.T. Johnsingh leans across his colleague Professor Mewa Singh to peer at me. “You know,” he says, “When a pack of dholes bring down a stag in velvet, they crunch up its antlers like they’re biscuits.” Having delivered this piece of trivia he settles back down in his seat and waits as I fumble for an appropriate response. Around us, a platoon’s worth of gun-wielding security personnel pace the temporary but beautiful conference hall at the Institute of Bioresources and Sustainable Development (IBSD), where we await the arrival of Okram Ibobi Singh, the Chief Minister of Manipur.

It’s a pleasant April morning in Imphal, and I am here on the invitation of the institute to attend a national workshop on the conservation of a benign ungulate species known as the brow-antlered deer or sangai. Just an hour’s drive from IBSD, confined to a wretchedly small parcel of unique habitat, lives the last remaining population of these deer in the world. Here, in the 40 sq. km. Keibul Lamjao National Park, this sub-species of Eld’s deer Rucervus eldii eldii quietly persists even as the threats around them steadily close in. A critically endangered, endemic, large mammal, you would expect the sangai to feature on the priority list of every government and non-governmental wildlife agency worth its salt, but the species has been largely ignored for decades, overlooked in favour of rhinos, bustards, tigers, elephants and other less endangered but more ‘charismatic’ animals.

Yet one ‘Lone Ranger’ has, for close to 40 years, consistently extended a lifeline to the species, while awaiting the awakening of authorities to its perilous status. Dr. M.K. Ranjitsinh hopes that today is that day. In the very first session of the workshop he critiques the population figure proposed by the state. His voice booms across the room, “Please underestimate the population!” he urges. “Ground surveys are not completely accurate. It is better that we err on the side of caution.”

Ranjitsinhji has good reason to worry. In 1975, it was he, as India’s Director of Wildlife that boarded a helicopter to conduct an aerial survey of Keibul Lamjao and in doing so discovered that poaching and habitat destruction had decimated sangai populations. Only 14 animals remained on earth. Subsequently, the national park was notified, the sangai received much-needed attention, and slowly made a recovery to its present numbers. But then it rapidly faded from conservation discourse. Back in the 70s, the situation was dire, but the threats were more manageable. Today, while the sangai population has risen to just over 200 individuals, the threats have diversified and evolved in complexity.

Read more:


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The Limbe Wildlife Centre on the right track

to save Africa’s most endangered species

By ILCW member Israel Bionyi (Cameroon)




More than 25 000 animals rescued in 22 years, 45 000 average annual visitors to the centre and more community engagement in conservation activities prove they are taking the appropriate move.

Gorilla section, LWC: Benito arrived at the Limbe Wildlife Centre in 1993. He enjoys seeing visitors; his care givers call him Mr. nice guy.


Hunting, selling of bush meat, keeping of wild pets and a host of other wildlife crimes were very popular in some areas of the South West region of Cameroon before the Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC) was found. The LWC is reputed for saving, rehabilitating and re-instating back to the wild, sizeable number of primates, avians, reptiles and mammals. The centre is also known for rehabilitating Africa’s most endangered cross river gorillas, rated critically endangered species on the International Union for Conservation(IUCN) red list, with just 250-300 individuals remaining.

The LWC is a conservation rescue, focused rehabilitation and reintroduction or release project that was initiated in 1993 by Pandrillus and the government of Cameroon. “Pandrillus is a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) with headquarters in Nigeria, founded by Peter Jenkins & Liza Gadsby. They came to Nigeria to rehabilitate drills (monkeys). When they walked to Cameroon to do research (on drills), they found that animals were in different stages of abuse and decided to look for a place to keep the animals. So they found this place (LWC) which was a victoria zoo unit in the 1960s. They signed an agreement with the government of Cameroon and the LWC was found.” Says Dr John. He is the acting project manager for Pandrillus.

Dr John, acting project coordinator at LWC

Pandrillus technically takes care of the centre while the government via the Ministry of Forestry & Wildlife (MINFOF) is the management authority. Pandrills constructs most of the structures, and provide most of the scientific knowledge while government runs the place, provides some workers which are paid by the state and also offers some funding for the projects, voted in the annual budget of MINFOF each year. He further explains.


Dr John together with the conservator, Mr Nkeng Philip Sunjo (representing the Cameroon government) leads a team comprised of vets, nurses, care givers, cleaners, educationists, cooks and volunteers. These conservationists work together day in day out to save endangered, vulnerable and critically endangered wildlife species.

Today is a busy one for the 15 man staff, present at the morning gathering. “After the morning assembly, we visit the various sections and see how the animals are faring. Then we can come back to other things” Says Dr John.

Continue

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We have sad news: man has determined that due to global warming, you are a threatened species…

And we have sad news:


So are you.


International League of Conservation Writers * 4690 Table Mountain Dr., Suite 100 * Golden, Colorado, USA 80403 * Phone: 303-277-1623 * www.ilcwriters.org
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